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Black boxes damaged in FlyDubai crash that killed 62 in Russia

Black boxes damaged in FlyDubai crash that killed 62 in Russia Mashable We're using cookies to improve your experience. Click Here to find out more. Mashable Mashable Mashable Australia Mashable France Mashable India Mashable UK Sign in Like Follow Follow Mashable see more  > Search Videos Social Media Tech Business Entertainment World Lifestyle Watercooler Shop More Channels Videos Social Media Tech Business Entertainment World Lifestyle Watercooler Shop Company About Us Licensing & Reprints Archive Mashable Careers Contact Contact Us Submit News Advertise Advertise Legal Privacy Policy Terms of Use Cookie Policy Apps iPhone / iPad Android Resources Subscriptions Sites Mashable Shop Job Board Social Good Summit World Like Follow Follow Black boxes damaged in FlyDubai crash that killed 62 in Russia 719 Shares Share Tweet Share What's This? ROSTOV-ON-DON, RUSSIA. MARCH 20, 2016. Pictured in this image are black box flight recorders recovered from the site of the FlyDubai Boeing 737-800 plane crash. 62 passengers and crew were killed in the crash. Interstate Aviation Committee Press Office/TASS (Photo by TASS\TASS via Getty Images) By Christopher Miller 2016-03-21 18:10:29 UTC Russian aviation officials say it's going to be very difficult to extract data from the black boxes of the FlyDubai flight that crashed in southern Russia because they're so badly damaged. The Boeing 737-800 from Dubai nosedived and exploded in a giant fireball short of the Rostov-on-Don airport runway at 3:42 a.m. local time on Saturday, killing all 62 people on board.  Closed-circuit TV footage showed the plane going down at a steep angle and exploding upon impact. The crash scattered debris and left a large crater in the runway. The plane was trying to land for a second time in poor weather. It had circled above the airport for more than two hours between landing attempts. SEE ALSO: Plane carrying dozens bursts into flames as it crashes near Russian airport The nationalities of the passengers included 44 Russians, 8 Ukrainians, 2 Indians and 1 Uzbek. Several planes had trouble landing at the airport around the time of the crash because of high winds. Some flights diverted to another airport. Investigation underway in Moscow Aviation experts in Moscow on Sunday began examining the black boxes recovered from the crash site at Rostov-on-Don airport.  Sergei Zaiko, deputy chairman of Russia's Interstate Aviation Committee which is investigating the crash, said on Russian state television Monday that the black boxes were damaged to the point that the experts could not immediately read their data, according to The Associated Press. Pictured in this image is one of the two black box flight recorders recovered from the site of the FlyDubai Boeing 737-800 plane crash. Image: TASS via Getty Images He said, however, that they have copied data from the data recorder but have not yet done that for the voice recorder. Once it's done, the experts will see if they can extract the data, he said. "In favorable circumstances, we will get preliminary results in a month," Zaiko added. The black boxes are designed to withstand heavy damage, and data from them can usually be obtained from them even in the worst cases.  Data recovered from the FlyDubai plane's recorders could be key in determining whether the cause of the crash was pilot error, something technical, bad weather or perhaps a combination of those things.  Even if the data is recovered, a full analysis of it will likely take weeks, or even months. Russian Emergency Ministry rescuers examine the wreckage of the crashed FlyDubai plane at the Rostov-on-Don airport on March 20, 2016. Image: VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images High winds likely played a big role in the crash While it's still too early to say definitely that high winds caused the crash, all signs point to the bad weather at least playing a big role in it. "Hazardous conditions were observed at Rostov-on-Don airport at the time of the crash." "A strong storm system was moving through western Russia early Saturday local time." wrote  Weather.com meteorologist Quincy Vagell. "Hazardous conditions were observed at Rostov-on-Don airport at the time of the crash, when rain was reported with strong wind gusts of 30 to 50 mph and visibility of around 1 mile or less." Russia's Interfax news agency quoted regional Governor Vasily Golubev as saying with all likelihood, "the strongly gusting wind, approaching a hurricane level, was the cause of the air crash." Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, speaking about the crash on Monday, said "it's too early for any conclusions, even preliminary ones." The plane's pilots, who were from Cyprus and Spain, did not issue any distress calls before the crash, according to Ghaith Al-Ghaith, CEO of FlyDubai. He said the plane had enough fuel to maintain its holding pattern above the airport, which went on for two hours. FlightRadar, which tracks flights around the world, reported the FlyDubai plane had star