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J.K. Rowling's second 'History of Magic in North America' chapter takes a darker turn

J.K. Rowling's second 'History of Magic in North America' chapter takes a darker turn Mashable We're using cookies to improve your experience. Click Here to find out more. Mashable Mashable Mashable Australia Mashable France Mashable India Mashable UK Sign in Like Follow Follow Mashable see more  > Search Videos Social Media Tech Business Entertainment World Lifestyle Watercooler Shop More Channels Videos Social Media Tech Business Entertainment World Lifestyle Watercooler Shop Company About Us Licensing & Reprints Archive Mashable Careers Contact Contact Us Submit News Advertise Advertise Legal Privacy Policy Terms of Use Cookie Policy Apps iPhone / iPad Android Resources Subscriptions Sites Mashable Shop Job Board Social Good Summit Entertainment Like Follow Follow J.K. Rowling's second 'History of Magic in North America' chapter takes a darker turn 778 Shares Share Tweet Share What's This? Part two of Rowling's series shows the 'dangers of being an American witch or wizard in the 17th century'.Image: @pottermore By Sam Haysom 2016-03-09 15:08:26 UTC LONDON — As is the case with the Harry Potter books, J.K. Rowling's new Pottermore series, " History of Magic in North America ," seems to be getting darker as it goes along. See also: New J.K. Rowling story angers Native American fans While the first piece focussed on the 14th century and Native American witches and wizards , part two jumps forward to the bloodthirsty 17th century, which comes complete with religious intolerance, the Salem Witch Trials, and grim magical mercenaries known as "Scourers". In piece two, uncover the dangers of being an American witch or wizard in the 17th century: https://t.co/EEdMJDtIfA pic.twitter.com/lvzdQZoxDq — Pottermore (@pottermore) March 9, 2016 Rowling's Scourers play a key role in the history of 17th century North American magic and, from the sounds of it, it may not be the last we've heard of them. After writing about the establishment of MACUSA (the Magical Congress of the United States of America) that followed Salem, Rowling goes on to explain that many of the Scourers were put on trial and executed after being, "convicted of murder, of wizard-trafficking, torture and all other manners of cruelty." But not all of them. "Several of the most notorious Scourers eluded justice. With international warrants out for their arrest, they vanished permanently into the No-Maj community. Some of them married No-Majs and founded families where magical children appear to have been winnowed out in favour of non-magical offspring, to maintain the Scourer’s cover. The vengeful Scourers, cast out from their people, passed on to their descendants an absolute conviction that magic was real, and the belief that witches and wizards ought to be exterminated wherever they were found." The third part of the "History of Magic in North America" will be released on the Pottermore website Thursday. Topics: Entertainment , harry potter , History of Magic in North America , jk rowling , Magic , UK About Us Jobs Advertise Subscribe Privacy Terms Mashable is a global, multi-platform media and entertainment company. Powered by its own proprietary technology, Mashable is the go-to source for tech, digital culture and entertainment content for its dedicated and influential audience around the globe. ©2005-2016 Mashable, Inc. Reproduction without explicit permission is prohibited. All Rights Reserved. Designed in collaboration with Code & Theory